The brook by alfred lord tennyson

His skilled craftsmanship and noble ideals retained a large audience for poetry in an age when the novel was engrossing more and more readers.

Critical analysis of the poem the brook by alfred lord tennyson

By thirty hills I hurry down, Or slip between the ridges, By twenty thorpes, a little town, And half a hundred bridges. I slip, I slide, I gloom, I glance, Among my skimming swallows; I make the netted sunbeam dance Against my sandy shallows. I steal by lawns and grassy plots, I slide by hazel covers; I move the sweet forget-me-nots That grow for happy lovers. I murmur under moon and stars In brambly wildernesses ; I linger by my shingly bars ; I loiter round my cresses ; And out again I curve and flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever. His skilled craftsmanship and noble ideals retained a large audience for poetry in an age when the novel was engrossing more and more readers. I chatter over stony ways, In little sharps and trehles, I bubble into eddying bays, I babble on the pebbles. I chatter, chatter, as I flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever. With many a curve my banks I fret By many a field and fallow, And many a fairy foreland set With willow-weed and mallow. I steal by lawns and grassy plots, I slide by hazel covers ; I move the sweet forget-me-nots That grow for happy lovers.

I wind about, and in and out, With here a blossom sailing, And here and there a lusty trout, And here and there a grayling, And here and there a foamy flake Upon me, as I travel With many a silvery waterbreak Above the golden gravel, And draw them all along, and flow To join the brimming river For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.

By thirty hills I hurry down, Or slip between the ridges, By twenty thorps, a little town, And half a hundred bridges. I chatter over stony ways, In little sharps and trehles, I bubble into eddying bays, I babble on the pebbles.

the brook by alfred lord tennyson pdf

Words to Know : Haunts : places frequently visited by Coot : a type of water bird with a white spot on the forehead Hem : heron, another kind of water bird Sally : emerge suddenly Bicker : here flow down with a lot of noise Thorpes : a type of village Trebles : high pitched tune Eddying : spiral movement of water Babble : sound made when one talks gaily Fallow : land left uncultivated to regain fertility Foreland : piece of land that extends into the sea Mallow : plant with hairy stems and leaves and pink white or purple flowers Lusty trout : a big freshwater fish Grayling : another type of fish Hazel : a small tree or bush with edible nuts Forget-me-nots : a type of flower Shingly : covered with small rounded pebbles Cresses : pungent leaved plant like a cabbage.

I murmur under moon and stars In brambly wildernesses; I linger by my shingly bars; I loiter round my cresses; And out again I curve and flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.

By thirty hills I hurry down, Or slip between the ridges, By twenty thorpes, a little town, And half a hundred bridges.

I steal by lawns and grassy plots, I slide by hazel covers I move the sweet forget-me-nots That grow for happy lovers.

song of the brook

With many a curve my banks I fret By many a field and fallow, And many a fairy foreland set With willow-weed and mallow. I murmur under moon and stars In brambly wildernesses ; I linger by my shingly bars ; I loiter round my cresses ; And out again I curve and flow To join the brimming river, For men may come and men may go, But I go on for ever.

By Alfred Tennyson more Alfred Tennyson I come from haunts of coot and hern, I make a sudden sally And sparkle out among the fern, To bicker down a valley.

The brook by alfred lord tennyson

I chatter over stony ways, In little sharps and trebles, I bubble into eddying bays, I babble on the pebbles.

Rated 5/10 based on 43 review
Download
Alfred Lord Tennyson