Write as a decimal 23 hundredths

Or we could round in a different place. Well a tenth is the same thing as 10 hundredths, so you could say, you could say instead of a tenth, you could say this is 10 hundredths, and the way I'm writing it right now, very few people would actually do it this way.

I'll write that as a hundredths place just so that we can keep track of it.

23 %as a fraction

So the method I'm going to show you will always work. As we move to the right or down the chart, the numbers increase by a factor of ten, so the answers increase by a factor of ten. Well a tenth is the same thing as 10 hundredths, so you could say, you could say instead of a tenth, you could say this is 10 hundredths, and the way I'm writing it right now, very few people would actually do it this way. Well actually, I'm going to do that in a separate. Other ways are to say look, I have a one in the tenths place, so that's going to be one tenth, one tenth and one tenth and I have a seven in the hundredths place, so this is a seven right over here in the hundredths place, so I can say one tenth and seven hundredths. And remember, it's always the denominator being divided into the numerator. And of course 20 hundredths and four hundredths is the same thing as 24 hundredths. Bring down the 0. But let's work it out. Have fun with the exercises. Rule for multiplying decimals A common way to multiply decimals is to treat them as whole numbers, and then position the decimal point in the product. And if you're saying well wait a minute, this looks like two tenths and four hundredths, you'd be right!

Maybe I'm just mistaken. Let's see.

23 hundredths as a fraction

Let's do another one of these, this is kinda fun. I'll leave that up to you as an exercise. I rounded in the 's place. The decimal point is the most important part of a Decimal Number.

23 percent as a decimal

We could keep figuring out the decimal points. I think we see a pattern forming again. And remember, it's always the denominator being divided into the numerator. Well, yeah. When we write numbers, the position or "place" of each digit is important. Maybe I'm just mistaken. Well actually, I'm going to do that in a separate. So by the logic that we saw in the first one, in the first one, we could just write this as, remember, this would be nine hundredths, and if we want one more hundredth, this would be 10 hundredths. And clearly, I could keep doing this forever and we'd keep getting 8's. So here, it's interesting. A tenth of a tenth or a tenth multiplied by a tenth is a hundredth, thus one tenth of eight tenths is eight hundredths. So we could write this as-- so once again, we would have our 20, So hopefully that makes sense. Well, we do the same thing.

And if we have time, maybe we'll learn how to do a decimal into a fraction. But in general, this line on top of the decimal means that this number pattern repeats indefinitely.

But we must first put a decimal point, so we know exactly where the Ones position is: "three hundred twenty seven and four tenths" but we usually just say "three hundred twenty seven point four" And that is a Decimal Number!

23 %as a decimal

Let's see how that works. But we must first put a decimal point, so we know exactly where the Ones position is: "three hundred twenty seven and four tenths" but we usually just say "three hundred twenty seven point four" And that is a Decimal Number! I'm going to resist the temptation to actually speak it out because that's normally how I operate. Alright, so there's actually a couple of ways that we could say this number. So we went to 3 decimals of significance. And I'm just going to add a bunch of trailing 0's here. This is hundreths. So we've got 20, You might not even need to pause it.
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Numbers with Two Decimal Digits